PRESS RELEASE: Amateur MMA Athletes Benefit as MMA Draft Gains Momentum

PRESS RELEASE – May 13, 2013

MMADraftcom

SACRAMENTO, Calif. MMADraft.com, a promotional platform for up-and-coming amateur combat sports athletes, has quickly become the go-to site for many of MMA’s rising stars. With the ever growing talent pool, it is becoming increasingly difficult for skilled amateur MMA fighters to identify what steps they need to take to build a successful future in the sport. Not only do they have to stand out amongst their peers as elite competitors, they have to build a presence outside of the cage as well. MMA Draft offers solutions and gives amateurs in the sport an edge on the competition.

Backed by industry influencers and fighters Urijah Faber and Phil Davis, MMADraft.com gives amateurs access to valuable resources that no other organization can offer, from media opportunities to advice from the pros. MMA Draft continues to add valuable features to the site as they evolve and according to the MMA Draft team, they are just getting started!

According to Phil Davis, “We are very excited about how quickly MMA Draft has evolved and how well it has been received in the MMA Community. MMA Draft has come a long way in a short time and we continue to find new ways to educate and promote deserving amateur athletes. The newest feature on MMADraft.com is a weekly blog called ‘The Draft Board’, authored by seasoned MMA Journalist Daniel Downes (who also writes for UFC.com). ‘The Draft Board’ touches on all subjects that pertain to Amateur MMA.”

Davis went on to say, “Daniel is also one of the experts on our MMA Draft ‘Ask a Pro’ panel (another added feature). Anyone can log on to MMADraft.com and submit a question pertaining to amateur MMA under ‘Ask a Pro’ and one of our experts will address it. Maggie Krol and Rick Lee have also joined our team and will be shooting human interest pieces and amateur MMA stories for the site. A lot of exciting things are happening at MMA Draft. We have a really big announcement coming soon, so stay tuned!”

In addition to providing great resources to amateur martial artists, the MMA Draft team actively generates publicity for their athletes through shows like ‘MMA Draft Spotlight with Trigg’, ‘The Great Debate’ Radio Show, Alchemist Radio, and many others. Registered MMA Draft athletes of all ages have the opportunity to earn their place in the spotlight. The more activity that they have on their MMA Draft profile, the more likely they are to get chosen.

Amateur martial artists of all ages and skill levels are encouraged to create a profile on www.MMADraft.com. The site is FREE to join and participating amateur athletes can upload photos and videos, document notable career achievements and more! The MMA Draft database also stores event results from Pankration, Submission Grappling, Wrestling and other sports that may lead to a career in martial arts.

About MMA Draft:
MMA Draft (www.MMADraft.com) was created for martial artists by martial artists to generate opportunities and exposure for combat sports athletes at the amateur level. It is the most comprehensive “Amateur” promotional platform of its kind and was formed by Urijah Faber and Phil Davis, accomplished MMA pros that know exactly what it takes to make it in the competitive world of mixed martial arts. MMADraft.com provides amateur fighters with a high-profile platform to showcase their skills, interactive forums to build a fan following, tips from industry pros and other valuable career resources. MMADraft.com is also a go-to source for managers, sponsors and promoters looking for talent. Additionally, MMADraft.com offers a variety of resources to parents, prospects, and fans of amateur combat sports. Resources include educational information, event info and more! MMA Draft executives are also working closely with key promotions, organizations and websites to become a central database for amateur events, seminars and results.

Strength and Conditioning in Competitive Martial Arts: Part 2

Monolith Grappling Arts

I apologize that it has been a while since my last installment on Soviet training methods. It’s been a shitstorm of events for me over the last month or so, and the sambo team has been pretty active, as well. We competed in the first ever NOLA Sambo Invitational and took first and second in the 74kg weight class, along with a great performance at the collegiate judo national qualifiers, and then the San Antonio Open. One of our young guys is days away from making a trip to Iowa to compete in the collegiate judo nationals. I am definitely bragging here, no doubt about it.

We left off last time talking about hours spent training, and the importance of general physical preparedness, which began our segue into sport specificity. As American athletes, we have heard quite a bit about sport specificity in the last 6 to 7 years, as this has become a vital part of all NCAA and professional strength training programs. There are scores of articles on unilateral resistance training for boxers, in order to develop a stronger right cross, or parachute training for sprinters, as a method to improve off-the-block explosion. Are these new methods? Absolutely not. They have, however, become more and more mainstream in the strength and conditioning world.

Rather than think about what physical activities we should do for our sport, though (we’ll talk about that soon), let’s look at specificity in another way: in the entire spectrum of human physical attributes, which are most likely to create success in your chosen sport? Then, similarly, what characteristics do you have that could play a role in your personal success? Arguably, basketball players have an advantage if they are tall. Anderson Silva has long limbs and a short torso. These things matter.

In the Soviet Union, athletes were selected at a young age for special training, based on physical characteristics that were conducive to success in particular sports. This is an early and very basic form of sport specificity, as certain characteristics are clearly better for certain sports. An example might be a large amount of hip and glute development at an early age, which could easily be tailored to achieve success in strength sports like weightlifting. A combat athlete might show more prowess in local muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, or speed during fine motor skills.

American sambo coach Gregg Humphreys (Dynamo Combat Club in Bettendorf, IA; sambo instructor for Miletich Fighting Systems) described this process to me last fall, as he received a physical evaluation from Soviet coaches during his first trips overseas for training. Coach Aaron Fields from Seatown Sambo in Seattle underwent a similar process, as well, during his time training with the national sambo and wrestling teams in Ulan Bator, Mongolia. Aaron is fairly tall, fairly lean, and has a background in judo and wrestling. Therefore, his evaluators determined that his focus should be on foot sweeps. These ideas were based on scientific, repeatable data, mined from hours and hours of research on athletes. From there, they were able to develop real, tangible numbers that applied to specific movements performed during specific sports. Judo athletes under a certain height are mathematically handicapped, because of their body type, in a certain group of techniques. They are advised to focus on dropping arm throws, for example, as opposed to techniques like the hiza guruma, or the “knee wheel”.

Think about your body type, and the things that you do well in your chosen combat sport. If you have long, lean legs, maybe the triangle choke should be your go-to. Or perhaps, if you are short and stocky like myself, sambo groundwork may suit you better: staying off your back, working for pinning techniques, and focusing more on top control than submissions. The same can be applied to striking, in principle. While taller guys tend to have a well-developed jab, designed to keep the opponent at a comfortable distance, there are shorter guys that have great jabs, also, like Miguel Cotto. The shorter guys have to apply it differently, though, and certainly cannot use it to keep a taller opponent on the outside. Rather, it is used for disrupting the opponent’s rhythm, or setting up a lunging hook.

This is all about efficiency, which is a huge component of the Soviet model. How can I make my skills as advanced as possible in the shortest amount of time? Take your natural attributes and exploit them. This is not to say that you should ignore certain aspects of the game; on the contrary, learn everything, but focus on developing those things that will take you to the top quickly, and use your training time wisely.

Taking Your Game to the Next Level – Nomad

I wanted to start the New Year off by talking about how Strength, Conditioning, and Nutrition play a vital role in mixed martial arts (MMA). Often times we see fighters, both amateur and pro; run out of energy in the cage. Good energy levels from bell to bell play an important role when it comes to whose hand is raised at the end of the fight. I’m sure many of you have seen a fighter come out for Round One with high energy, however; by Round Two or Three become sluggish and unable to defend themselves and ultimately loose the fight.

Ray Rod The Judge
Photo courtesy of Spida Photography

Fighters must find the right balance in their training and in their fight. Fighters should understand that strength, conditioning, and nutrition are also part of a successful game.

Joel Jamieson, founder of 8weeksout.com, is one of MMA’s top Strength & Conditioning Coaches and pioneers and is widely regarded as the nation’s leading expert in the science of physical conditioning for MMA. His no nonsense scientific approach and Precision Conditioning training system is helping to revolutionize how today’s top fighters get in shape and has been instrumental in the success of more than 20 of the world’s best fighters from the UFC, Dream, WEC, Shooto, K-1, PrideFC, and other major organizations.

In one of Joel’s articles titled “Ultimate Fight Conditioning – Push the Pace” he writes “regardless of a fighter’s weight class, every cell in their body needs a constant supply of energy to function. This includes the cells within muscle fibers, of course, and they need energy in order to do their job of contracting and producing the force it takes to throw strikes, go for and defend takedowns, attempt a submission, etc.”

He goes on to say “Dynamic sports like MMA that require an athlete to produce a ton of energy to support high levels of muscle force and power for up to 15-25 minutes no doubt rely on both aerobic and anaerobic energy production – there is simply no way that either system alone is capable of producing enough energy by itself. This fact is generally well known and accepted, but what’s often misunderstood, however, is just how important the balance between these two energy systems really is.”

He then breaks it down to three major components, developing your cardiovascular system to deliver as much oxygen to the working muscles as possible, training the muscles to become more efficient at using the oxygen that your cardiovascular system is able to deliver and finally incorporating a training method called pace work. For combat sports, this type of work should take the form of sparring or pad/work and the general guideline is simply to deliberately train at the maximum pace you can sustain without any real measure of fatigue.

Right here in Texas we have great strength, conditioning, and nutrition personal trainers who are making a difference for Texas fighters. The Muscle Factory, of San Antonio, is one of those training facilities. Roland Gonzalez, Owner and Head Trainer, of the Muscle Factory has been helping amateur and pro MMA fighters for years. Roland will tell you that “we are not here to replace the importance of stand-up, wrestling, or jiu jitsu, we are here to supplement it.”

Roland continues “We can help improve a fighter’s game by first improving their cardio and muscle endurance by incorporating a variety of exercise regiments that fit the fighter’s needs and lifestyle. Secondly, we would start a diet plan that would help with strength and muscle recovery that will help maintain fighter energy.”

“The only real way to make lasting changes, regardless of your goals, is to use a holistic (meaning whole body) strategy. Every muscle group, including the heart the lungs, nutrition and diet, and positive mental wellness all have to be included in your overall program.”

While at the Muscle Factory I was able to watch Roland put Ray “The Judge” Rodriguez, a pro mma fighter out of San Antonio, though one of his two hour work out. Wow….it was high paced! I was impressed with Roland’s personal attention to detail and motivation during Ray’s work out.

After his workout, Ray told me “Training at the Muscle Factory has made me a complete fighter. My size, strength, stamina, and speed have all improved greatly.” Ray also said “Roland Gonzalez is amazing at what he does, and is one of the most genuine people I have ever met in my life. He’s been at every weigh in and been able to help me put back on 15 to 20 pounds before my fight time.”

In closing I would say seek out a professional trainer who can help you with taking your game to the next level.

If you wish to contact Muscle factory please call 210-771-9044 or visit them at www.themusclefactory.synthasite.com

Nomad
Photo courtesy of Spida Photography

“I want to look into their soul and break them…” Cody “WOLVERINE” Williams

Interview with Mixed Martial Artist Cody “WOLVERINE” Williams , he will be traveling to Louisiana/Delta Downs on July 7th. Fighting out of Beaumont,Texas, The Main Event and a great opt for him to bring back the IXFA Title…Let’s keep Texas Fighting!!

sPidA: You came out with a BANG from ammy to Pro, was there alot of pressure making the transition?

Cody: No pressure at all it was just time and after getting the nod from American Top Team HQ that i was ready it was just finding a fight after that.

sPidA: You’ve had 5 bouts as a PRO fighter, other then getting paid to punch people, what has been the best thing about finally going Pro?

Cody: Bigger stages to perform on – businesses tend to take you more serious when you sit down and talk with them and you’re a professional fighter – unfortunately theres no governing body to filter talent and someone who just applies for their pro card

sPidA: Your last bout was an unfortunate loss, how where you able to stay focus and prepare for a title shot /IXFA?

Cody: A hiccup – both losses have just been fractional errors on my part – Benoit said he was going to bring a fight to me so when I backed up to let him up he hit me with a savvy little trip move and took the back – kudos to him for the win – but if you watch the fight I think we know who was bringing the heat.

sPidA: Will fighting for IXFA in the Delta Downs be the first time fighting outside the State of Texas?

Cody: I have fought in Louisiana a couple of times as an amateur but this will be the first trip as a professional

sPidA: Your waiting backstage and they finally call your name to walk out, what goes through your mind and what helps you stay focused?

Cody: I just look down at the cage as a playground and try to make as much eye contact with my opponent as possible – i want to look in their soul and break them before the first bell ever rings – i just tell myself this guy signed a contract will full intent to beat me up and take my money, my sons money and food – that will drive any person.

sPidA: I’ve personally followed your social media outlets, (FB/TWITTER etc) How important is it for a fighter to manage there status and how has this been helping you in your fighting career?

Cody: Its worked for me – I haven’t put on a show or a gimmick I mean I post what going on with me and give the fans and sponsors an inside view of what goes on with me – also has helped me build a fan base that i might not have been able to do by just fighting.

sPidA: With so many MMA movies out there, which has been your fave so far and if given the opt, would you star in one?

Cody: I liked Warrior – the story about the teacher was cool and grabbed the audience – I saw a lot of what i fight for in his character and working for the law firm at that time had a lot of the same feelings – showing up to work with bruises and black eyes having to go in front of other professionals was kinda awkward but I made it out like, “yeah this is a real black eye and busted lip” as far as the plot it was okay but i really favored that particular character – The Mickey Ward story was really good too! I think it was The Fighter? Hands down though i have to go with the messy bare knuckled boxer in “Snatch”!! I think my story would make a great movie – and would love to star in one – I think I could be a pretty good actor in a movie even if it wasn’t my story necessarily

sPidA: Your work outs are insane and your always pushing yourself to the limit, what keeps you motivated to pursue your dreams?

Cody: Goes to my son – I mean I’ve made the transition to train full time now and its hard not knowing where that next paycheck will come from – I started my own business and have been working on getting it off the ground – everyday is a blessing there are people out there that have children that cant walk or be active in anyway, kids that would do anything just to see what it feels like to run down the street or catch a baseball, “God gives us these talents and if you sit idle on them he may just take them away” I can’t imagine what it would be like to be in a position where i couldnt workout or train so when im tired or feel like I cant make that last round I just think about how blessed I am and suck it up and push through it

sPidA: Not to over look your next opponent but after the Title win,what’s next on your Mixed Martial Arts agenda?

Cody: keep training keep fighting – I’ll be going back to American Top Team in Florida after this fight to do some more training and hopefully getting ready to take another fight – Legacy, IXFA, Fight Time in Florida and BAMMA USA in Cali have all shown interest but currently I have 2 more fights on my contract with Legacy so they have first pick.

sPidA: Thank you brother, best to you in your travels and keeping Texas Fighting, any last shouts to your friends,fans and sponsors?

Cody: I want to thank my family and support system that has made it possible for me to train full time – my friends for believing in me even when I don’t come out of the cage with a win they are always there to pick me up – to GOD for blessing me and keeping me motivated through my son – all my sponsors especially Sign Builders of America in Austin , Major League Grill, Trey Lacy DDS, Spidle Oil, West LTD, APAC Construction all located here in South East Texas, 88MilesWest.com and ZeroCutCreative.com and the newest addition to my team World Gym here in Beaumont – they are doing some great things for the Wounded Warrior Foundation and im stoked to be a part of that! Certainly American Top Team and The Mostyn Law Firm for all that they have done. My boy SUBTRAXZ (Chris Sublett) and Headz Will Roll Recordz for all the custom sounds that i get to workout too and walkout to! And to Cruz Combat for the custom fight shorts i love them cant wait to walk down to the cage July 7th!!! TexasFighting.com!!!!

Gilbert “The Pitbull” Jimenez Strength & Conditioning in Preparation for Legacy FC 9 Fight on HDNet

 GILBERT “The Pitbull” Jimenez

“Just one of many reps “Pitbull” had to endure by Jerry Hill and his torture tools. Yikes! Great stuff and a must for any type of combat sport!” – Spida

Music Credits: Agnostic Front “My Life My Way”

Video Footage: Spida

Video Editing: Chris Lopez Jr.